TERROR IN GLOBAL NARRATIVE:

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TERROR IN GLOBAL NARRATIVE:

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Title: TERROR IN GLOBAL NARRATIVE:
Author: Korstanje, Maximiliano
Abstract: The attacks to World Trade Center on 11 of September of 2001 brought substantial changes not only in the way the United States conceived its homeland security, but also others peripheral nations, which stayed on the side-lines of the previous conflict between Bin Laden and George Bush senior, faced a securitization process accompanied with an unparalleled hysteria. To a major or minor degree, it is safe to say henceforth terrorism unveiled a long dormant fascination and obsession in American spectorship for gazing death, a new emerging phenomenon theorised by Tumarkin (2005) as “traumascape”. As Luke Howie (2012) puts it, terrorists do not want a lot of people dead, they like a lot of people watching!. This suggests that one of the chief goals of terrorists are not strictly associated to violence as the specialized literature precludes, but preferably to a vicarious sentiment of fear amplified precisely in those who do not stand at the centre of picture. With some hindsight, Howie found a correlation between physical distance and fearmongering. Precisely, as Howie adheres, those societies situated in the global Southern periphery underwent higher levels of anxiety that often led towards an atmosphere of mistrust and terror than hapless New Yorkers.
Date: 2017-05-01


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